Suppose in a boxing match one boxer is attacked and battered by an opponent. But if the battered boxer just keeps fighting, the attacker tires and weakens. Then, the defender can counter-attack and knock out the opponent.

If we compare our own consciousness to a boxing ring, going on there is a boxing match between us and our lower desires. Therein, because of our inner conditionings and our outer culture, we may be battered by our lower desires. They may torment us intolerably to goad us into degrading indulgences.

However, no matter how battered we may be, we don’t have to be shattered. Battering happens to us from outside, even if that that outside refers to the mind, which, despite being inside us from the physical perspective, is still external to us as souls. In contrast, shattering refers to the loss of our will to fight, the soul giving up the intention to fight in dejection. At the start of the Bhagavad-gita (01.46), Arjuna was on the verge of quitting. But by the Gita’s end (18.73), his will to fight was restored. The Gita offers that same empowerment to all of us.

Gita wisdom explains that the soul being indestructible in constitution can never be shattered. And it can become indefatigable in intention too if it just stays connected with the whole: the all-powerful, all-loving Supreme, Krishna. The Bhagavad-gita (09.30) assures that those who stay firm in their devotional intention are to be considered saintly even if their actions are reproachable.

By our unflinching devotional intention and connection, we all can access Krishna’s unfailing grace from within our hearts. Thereby, we will overcome all impurities and attain enduring peace, with our lower desires not just restrained but also transcended by the higher purpose and joy of absorption in Krishna

Source

Read more http://www.gitadaily.com/we-may-be-battered-but-we-dont-have-to-be-shattered/

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

%d bloggers like this: